Friday, November 29, 2019

London Bridge attack today confounds usual divisions in journalism between right and left


The earliest information coming out of London is that the perpetrator of the knife attack, Usman Khan, had been in prison for earlier offense.

You can interpret this in a few ways.  If the UK were more lax on guns, he could have killed more people.  But you could turn this around and argue that the pedestrians could have defended themselves, from an asymmetric attack.
  
The citizens who stepped up like unarmed soldiers became casualties.
    
CNN has always been hawkish on national security for all western countries despite its reputation for being on the Left.

London Bridge special web picture on wikipedia. I crossed it myself on foot in Nov. 1982. 

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Greenhouse gas emissions increasing even more rapidly than expected



Somini Sengupta writes in the New York Times Tuesday about a newer United Nations report that indicates greenhouse gasses are increasing even much more rapidly than expected.  
  

Governments are planning top produce about 50% more fossil fuels by 2030 than is consistent with keeping warming by 2050 to 1.5 C.  

The BBC reports that tipping points can be reached at only 1-2 degrees C increase rather than 5 degrees, and refers to a Nature article with a world map showing nine specific areas of greatest concern. 

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Trump administration wants to make asylum seekers wait longer to work


Yael Sachacher has an important op-ed in the Washington Post today, “Why forbidding asylum seekers from working undermines the right to seek asylum”, link here  (paywall).

The Trump administration has proposed a rule to go in the Federal register extending the waiting time before asylum seekers (at least from some Central American countries) beyond the 180 days.


The opinion piece considers this to violate international law, as undermining a right to survive.

The policy seems motivated by Trump’s base, by fear of job market competition (where in many cases there are labor shortages), and fear of gang associations (which is problematic, because generally Central American immigrants have lower crime rates than Americans, but there are some unpredictable risks).
  
The only way to bridge this gap is to encourage private sponsorship efforts, which right now are informal.  Pay attention to Canada.

Monday, November 18, 2019

Western China's not-so-hidden abuse of Muslim populations, being overlooked while Hong Kong goes on


While violence seems to surge again in Hong Kong, in western China (Xingjiang) Uyghur peoples are severely monitored with kids and some parents kept in reeducation camps to become “Chinese”.


The Washington Post has a detailed story by Lateshia Beachum. 

This shows how for China will go to discipline and socialize its outlier peoples. 
  
 The people often practice Islam and look Caucasian.

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Independent media noticing the bombing and gang events in Sweden, especially Malmo


There are increasing reports, mainly in independent and sometimes conservative Media, that some areas of Sweden, especially Malmo, are getting overrun with criminal gang attacks and bombings, and burglaries. Quillette has a recent story by Henrik Jonsson, “Abandoning Malmo to its Criminals”. 
  

Andy Ngo mention this story on Twitter.  It refers to an early story that presents a particularly shocking picture of Malmo.

Tim Pool described real problems in Sweden in 2017, after a trip subsidized by Watson, and criticized by some as “helicopter journalism”.   His explanation here is pretty lucid, about the quibbling in the discussion.

He recently posted another discussion of the recent bombings especially in Malmo.

I have a friend in NYC who came from Germany and told me about similar problems in Berlin when I saw her in September 2016 (before the election).  In Germany there is suppression of criticism of hospitality to migrants and the apparent personal risks for people there it may cause.
  
I visited Sweden in myself in early August 1972, taking the train to Kiruna from Narvik.  Some one tried to “pick me up” in a hotel in Kiruna, an odd place for a solicitation. The iron mines in the distance are spectacular.  I met a student from Montreal on the train back to Stockholm, and corresponded with him for two or three years. 

Wikipedia: 
By Fpo74 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Conservative YouTube channel claims China is accusing the CIA of promoting feminization of men in Asia




“Black Pigeon Speaks”, whose YouTube channel was briefly banned (he is a normal conservative) reports that China has accused the American CIA of encouraging “feminization” of men in Asia. This sounds a little like an expansion of the “Manchurian candidate” idea (guess who that is).


This started in Japan after WWII (maybe understandable), spread to Korea in the 1980s as the South Korean government wanted to distract citizens from politics, and then to China.

He talks about “soy boys” in the West (I think Eduardo discussed this in a video, and probably Tim Pool) and “meat” in Asian countries.  China has complained that is men are being “sissified”.
The video seems also aimed at those who want to see gender fluidity be seen as OK.

BPS also notes that physically stronger and more physically attractive men (including gay men – Eduardo Sanchez-Ubanell is a good example) tend to be more conservative (or at least libertarian) politically, and resent the intersectionalities imposed by the far Left.  There are cultural splits growing in LGBTQ communities in all western countries.
  
BPS also avoids using the term “Nazi” in the video at all, which Tim Pool has said gets videos removed.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Job market and training in Kenya, hampered by social values?


Someone sent me a story about a job skills “boot camp” in Moringa, Kenya, noting that university graduates do not find jobs there.

   
The mismatch between education in these countries and jobs may be leftover from colonialism and may well be complicated by antiquated social values (and homophobia), which makes volunteerism and foreign assistance (except from non-democratic countries) difficult.  It may be difficult for large western companies to function well, which tends to make these countries targets for China, Russia, etc (even North Korea).  So the bad faith influence of some “evangelists” in the past may be bad for security now.
 
Wikipedia  child labor in Kenya picture: 
By Kabai Ken - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Monday, November 4, 2019

Journalist in Congo who warned about Ebola killed in attack


A journalist in the Congo who had also worked as a volunteer and who raised awareness of Rbola, was killed in a local terror attack. He worked for a radio station in Lwemba, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.    ABC News reports
  

ABC links to a story of “what you need to know” about Ebola, comparing it to HIV in being bloodborne (this can be misleading politically).

Vaccine use is increasing “concentrically” but there are new antibody therapies that can increase survival.  

Saturday, November 2, 2019

"The Rising Threat of Digital Nationalism" in this weekend's Wall Street Journal


Akash Kapur has a major “Saturday Essay” in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, “The Rising Threat of Digital Nationalism”, link
  

China has set the example. Russia wants to set up a "Runet” with a kill switch to the outside world".  About 25% of all countries have shut down Internet for temporary periods, causing logistical disruption for visitors and citizens and businesses alike. 

The sub-headline on p. 2 of the continuation is “Is the Global Internet Coming to an End?

The basic underlying problem is populism;  politicians, however oligarchical, find they can soothe inequalities if they prod individualistic citizens back into localism and tribalism, moving up to nationalism.

The article talks about the possible evolution of a “splinternet”
 .
It also suggests that big social media companies should be mediated by the same sorts of fairness doctrines that conventional media had in the past.
   
But the growth of huge tech empires with a few large companies controlling things came about as the Dotcom boom started to come apart around the year 2000.